Health, Wealth and Retirement Study

Countless unknowns accompany planning for retirement. Economic conditions, long-term market performance and inflation are all uncertainties that baby boomers grapple with as this milestone draws near. But one of the most pressing — and indeed most personal — issues people will contend with on their path to retirement is the state of their health.

Recent changes in health care policy stemming from the enactment of the Affordable Care Act have put a spotlight on the rising cost of health care in the United States. Around the country, Americans are sorting out how much money they need to set aside to cover health care related expenses, and how they’ll keep pace with future increases.

Women and Financial Power Study

Women are continuing to gain more and more power economically, politically and socially. Today there are three times as many women earning college degrees than in 1970, and 71 percent of mothers with children under age 18 are working.1 Only 40 years have passed since the Equal Credit Opportunity Act made it illegal for lenders to discriminate based on gender, and the number of women-owned businesses rose 44 percent between 1997 and 2007 – and has likely continued to grow since then.2

But when it comes to household finances – saving for retirement, managing budgets and making insurance and investment decisions – how are women involved, and what motivates their role in making financial decisions? That is what the Women and Financial PowerSM study set out to understand. The data uncovered that nearly every American woman surveyed is influencing these decisions or making them on her own; and those women nearing retirement, one of life’s biggest milestones, are most engaged in and confident about their finances.